At our December meeting members were invited to show fresh material or share a set of images from the past six years since the group's inception. 

This attracted a wonderfully diverse range of pictures for everyone to enjoy, from insightful expressions to experimental adventures.

Beginning at home, four contributions featured scenes in and around Worcester.  Heather used her camera to reveal aspects of fast moving fairground rides at the recent Victorian Fayre.  The same Fayre and of some of its quirkier aspects and oddities presented a theme for Peter's particular vision.   Anne's set reminded us about the extent of recent flooding in the city when the River Severn overflowed its banks and the photo-opportunities this provided.  Many of Tessa's images from her continuing 'Empty' project showed, though the intriguing juxtaposition of reflections in the windows of abandoned shops, just how precarious and fleeting retail trade can be.  

Moving away from the city, Bob transported us to Eastbourne where he explored its iconic pier through a series of eloquent intentional-camera-movement studies.  Transporting us further afield, David introduced us to aspects of life in Myanmar (onetime Burma).  Maintaining the thought of transport for a moment, Clive's AV, 'The Colours Through the Window', was a colour tone poem which, through a series of 'streaky movement pictures', illustrated the changes of colour in the landscape during a railway journey from Worcester to Bath Spa. 

In contrast, Judy took us to Casablanca where in particular, she revealed aspects of the elegantly proportioned Hassan VI Mosque.  Keeping in warmer climes and beginning with a series of Escher-like dimensional puzzle pictures, Paul explored the mind-boggling 3,500 tiered steps at the Abhaneri Step Well (Chand Balori) near Agra, India. 

Taking the natural world as inspiration, Angie presented a thoughtful number of pictures about the passage of time, whether expressed through the mercurial twinkle of water droplets rushing over a weir, the gradual the growth-rings of a tree or the aeon-slow distortions of rock strata.  Lucy also favoured nature for her exploration of the diverse forms to be discovered amongst flowers, their stems and seed-heads. 

Brian offered a selection which included his particular fascination with spiral staircases.  With something completely different, Barrie premiered a number of his most recent adventures into the world of 'experimental photography'. 

Retrospectives were provided by three members:  Eric illustrated how, through his developing interest in the contemporary style of photography, this insight had expanded his photographic horizons.  John's 'contemporary reflections' were themed around his acutely observational eye in his 'body language' series.   Alex's set was wide ranging and included his response and interpretations to people's faces, street art, street photography, umbrellas, contrasts of culture and expressive hands. 

This was indeed a rich diet and a most satisfying feast of photography.

Our two outside sources this month showed once again how diverse contemporary and conceptual photography can be.

Daniel Peebles has created a beautifully insightful series, 'Mise-en-Scène', triptychs depicting a frank portrait of American family.


'Mise-en-Scène'

 

Steve Buesden's successful ARPS Conceptual & Contemporary application, 'An Encounter with Anxiety' panel, strongly illustrates the tension, practice and implements during a visit to the dentist.

An Encounter with Anxiety

 

During the break we enjoyed a selection of 'festive nibbles'.  They didn't last long!

Note: Next Meeting - Change of Date for January
Realising the scheduled date of 2nd January is really far too close to New Year revelries - (and recovery! ) we've changed the date to the second Thursday, 9th January.  Please make a note of this.

The gallery below offers a selection of what we enjoyed.

December CPG Members' Gallery:  to shuttle through, click to open the image then, use the on-screen forward > and < reverse  arrows, or your keyboard arrow (> <) keys.